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Tuesday, 28 June 2022 00:00

The foot withstands considerable force placed on it by all the activities we do, including walking. There are 26 bones in the foot that are connected by joints and supported by ligaments to absorb the impact of movement. Also, muscles and tendons in the foot allow for flexing and extending the foot. Bones in the foot can break from direct blows, injuries, falls, overuse, or stress. Symptoms of a broken foot include pain, swelling, bruising, and an inability to put weight on the foot. If a bone is sticking out from the foot after a fracture, it is more serious and could become a deformity. Most foot fractures are treated with a compression dressing, a stiff soled shoe or boot, and weight bearing as tolerated. Complications can arise from a foot fracture if the bones do not heal properly, if arthritis is involved, one has peripheral neuropathy, or if the skin is broken and an infection develops. Healing time depends on the type of break and the bones involved. A podiatrist should be consulted to confirm a break, access its severity, and for a proper treatment regimen.

A broken foot requires immediate medical attention and treatment. If you need your feet checked, contact Dr. Michael A. Wood from Foot Health Institute. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Broken Foot Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

A broken foot is caused by one of the bones in the foot typically breaking when bended, crushed, or stretched beyond its natural capabilities. Usually the location of the fracture indicates how the break occurred, whether it was through an object, fall, or any other type of injury. 

Common Symptoms of Broken Feet:

  • Bruising
  • Pain
  • Redness
  • Swelling
  • Blue in color
  • Numbness
  • Cold
  • Misshapen
  • Cuts
  • Deformities

Those that suspect they have a broken foot shoot seek urgent medical attention where a medical professional could diagnose the severity.

Treatment for broken bones varies depending on the cause, severity and location. Some will require the use of splints, casts or crutches while others could even involve surgery to repair the broken bones. Personal care includes the use of ice and keeping the foot stabilized and elevated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Lansing, and Chicago, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment for a Broken Foot
Tuesday, 21 June 2022 00:00

Intermetatarsal neuroma, or Morton’s neuroma, refers to a thickening of nerve tissue surrounding a nerve in the foot that is compressed or irritated. This compression can be the result of wearing high heels or other shoes that force the toes unnaturally into a narrow space. Morton’s neuroma typically occurs between the third and fourth toes. Engaging in certain athletic activities, like court sports or running, can also cause repetitive irritation to the nerves between the toes. Symptoms of Morton’s neuroma include pain, or the sensation of something being under the ball of the foot. There may be numbness, burning, or tingling, or it may feel like there is a bunched up sock or pebble in the front of the shoe. As the neuroma progresses over time, the pain may worsen and permanent nerve damage may occur. That is why it is very important to have your foot examined by a podiatrist if you believe you may have Morton’s neuroma. The earlier the diagnosis, the more likely it is that your podiatrist can treat the issue conservatively, rather than surgically.  

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Michael A. Wood of Foot Health Institute. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Lansing, and Chicago, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about What is Morton's Neuroma?
Tuesday, 14 June 2022 00:00

Children and young teenagers who participate in running and jumping activities can be prone to developing Sever’s disease. This foot condition impacts the heel and typically affects children between the ages of 8 and 13. The Achilles tendon connects the heel to the calf muscles, and Sever’s disease may occur when the growth plate in the heel grows faster than the Achilles tendon. It is considered to be an overuse injury and can affect children who run and jump on hard surfaces. Effective prevention techniques include wearing quality shoes that fit correctly and have shock-absorbent soles, maintaining a healthy weight, and performing specific stretches for the heel. One such stretch, the heel drop, is accomplished by standing on a step and lowering one heel at a time until a gentle stretch is felt. If your child has heel pain, it is strongly suggested that he or she is under the care of a podiatrist who can effectively manage this condition.

Because RA affects more than just your joints, including the joints in your feet and ankles, it is important to seek early diagnosis from your podiatrist if you feel like the pain in your feet might be caused by RA. For more information, contact Dr. Michael A. Wood of Foot Health Institute. Our doctor will assist you with all of your podiatric concerns.

What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder in which the body’s own immune system attacks the membranes surrounding the joints. Inflammation of the lining and eventually the destruction of the joint’s cartilage and bone occur, causing severe pain and immobility.

Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Feet

Although RA usually attacks multiple bones and joints throughout the entire body, almost 90 percent of cases result in pain in the foot or ankle area.

Symptoms

  • Swelling and pain in the feet
  • Stiffness in the feet
  • Pain on the ball or sole of feet
  • Joint shift and deformation

Diagnosis

Quick diagnosis of RA in the feet is important so that the podiatrist can treat the area effectively. Your doctor will ask you about your medical history, occupation, and lifestyle to determine the origin of the condition. Rheumatoid Factor tests help to determine if someone is affected by the disease.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Lansing, and Chicago, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Rheumatoid Arthritis in the Feet
Tuesday, 07 June 2022 00:00

Plantar warts are small growths that develop on parts of the feet that bear weight. They're typically found on the bottom of the foot. Don't live with plantar warts, and call us today!

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