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Tuesday, 17 May 2022 00:00

A tiny crack in the bone is known as a stress fracture. It generally develops as a result of repetitive pressure that can come from participating in running and jumping activities. If you see your child limping or choosing not to take part in these types of activities, this may indicate a stress fracture. Some of the symptoms typically associated with this condition include swelling, pain, and tenderness when touched. Some children may endure this type of fracture from nutritional deficiencies or fragile bones. It is suggested that the activity that caused the stress fracture be temporarily stopped, which gives the foot a chance to heal. Additionally, many children wear a boot or cast, which can be helpful in providing stability as the healing process occurs. If you think your child has developed a stress fracture, it is strongly suggested that you speak with a podiatrist as quickly as possible to discuss correct treatment options with you.

Activities where too much pressure is put on the feet can cause stress fractures. To learn more, contact Dr. Michael A. Wood from Foot Health Institute. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep your pain free and on your feet.

Dealing with Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle

Stress fractures occur in the foot and ankle when muscles in these areas weaken from too much or too little use.  The feet and ankles then lose support when walking or running from the impact of the ground. Since there is no protection, the bones receive the full impact of each step. Stress on the feet can cause cracks to form in the bones, thus creating stress fractures.

What Are Stress Fractures?

Stress fractures occur frequently in individuals whose daily activities cause great impact on the feet and ankles. Stress factors are most common among:

  • Runners                                  
  • People affected with Osteoporosis
  • Tennis or basketball players
  • Gymnasts
  • High impact workouts

Symptoms

Pain from the fractures occur in the area of the fractures and can be constant or intermittent. It will often cause sharp or dull pain with swelling and tenderness. Engaging in any kind of activity which involves high impact will aggravate pain.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Lansing, and Chicago, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 10 May 2022 00:00

Heel pain in children and young teenagers can indicate the existence of a condition that is known as Sever’s disease. It is defined as an inflammation of the growth plate that is located in the heel. It can happen as a result of repetitive stress on the heel during a growth spurt, and can be common among male children who participate in sporting and jumping activities. Patients who develop Sever’s disease may find their heel pain can make it difficult to walk. Relief can be found when the activity that caused the condition is temporarily stopped, and stretching exercises are performed. Research has shown there may be preexisting conditions that can lead to Sever’s disease, including weak ankles, and poor shock absorption. If your child is limping, and you notice he has heel pain, it is strongly advised that you confer with a podiatrist as quickly as possible who can recommend correct treatment options.

Sever's disease often occurs in children and teens. If your child is experiencing foot or ankle pain, see Dr. Michael A. Wood from Foot Health Institute. Our doctor can treat your child’s foot and ankle needs.

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s disease is also known as calcaneal apophysitis, which is a medical condition that causes heel pain I none or both feet. The disease is known to affect children between the ages of 8 and 14.

Sever’s disease occurs when part of the child’s heel known as the growth plate (calcaneal epiphysis) is attached to the Achilles tendon. This area can suffer injury when the muscles and tendons of the growing foot do not keep pace with bone growth. Therefore, the constant pain which one experiences at the back of the heel will make the child unable to put any weight on the heel. The child is then forced to walk on their toes.

Symptoms

Acute pain – Pain associated with Sever’s disease is usually felt in the heel when the child engages in physical activity such as walking, jumping and or running.

Highly active – Children who are very active are among the most susceptible in experiencing Sever’s disease, because of the stress and tension placed on their feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Lansing, and Chicago, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

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Sunday, 08 May 2022 00:00

If you are suffering from tenderness, pain, or stiffness in the joints of your feet or ankles, call us to schedule an appointment.

Tuesday, 03 May 2022 00:00

Wounds on the feet can be a common occurrence for much of the population, and they can be a serious concern among the elderly. This can be a result of diminished blood flow in the feet and immediate medical attention may help to avoid potential problems. Effective wound prevention can include moisturizing the feet and drinking plenty of fresh water daily. Additionally, it may help to take a multivitamin that is designed to protect the skin. The skin color may turn when a wound is present, and a clean environment is needed for successful wound healing. This is followed by using a non-adherent dressing and placing a cushioned bandage over the wound. A pressure ulcer is a common type of wound that elderly people may develop. This often happens as a result of pressure that occurs over a bone. If you would like more information about types of foot wounds and how to treat them, it is strongly suggested that you confer with a podiatrist.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Michael A. Wood from Foot Health Institute. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Lansing, and Chicago, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
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