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Foot Corn Treatment

Tuesday, 26 April 2022 00:00

A foot corn is a hardened layer of skin that develops on the foot due to friction or pressure. Foot corns can develop below the toenail bed, between toes, or on the sides and bottom of the feet. Most often, corns develop from snug shoes and/or socks and become aggravated from prolonged periods of standing or walking, body weight, and continual friction, causing them to become painful. If you suspect you have a corn on your foot your first action should be to change footwear to those that fit properly. You can try to soften a corn by carefully soaking the affected foot in warm water with Epsom salts, drying the foot thoroughly, and moisturizing it daily. Once softened, you can try to gently rub the corn on the bottom of the foot with a pumice stone. Using an emery board, if the corn is located between the toes, you can apply a vegetable-based oil and cover it with a corn pad that can be obtained from a drug store. Continue this treatment for a couple of weeks. However, if there is pain associated with home treatment or the corn persists or worsens, it is suggested that you seek guidance from a qualified podiatrist to assist in treating the corn.

Corns can make walking very painful and should be treated immediately. If you have questions regarding your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Michael A. Wood of Foot Health Institute. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? And How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns are thickened areas on the skin that can become painful. They are caused by excessive pressure and friction on the skin. Corns press into the deeper layers of the skin and are usually round in shape.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as:

  • Wearing properly fitting shoes that have been measured by a professional
  • Wearing shoes that are not sharply pointed or have high heels
  • Wearing only shoes that offer support

Treating Corns

Although most corns slowly disappear when the friction or pressure stops, this isn’t always the case. Consult with your podiatrist to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Lansing, and Chicago, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Understanding Corns and Calluses
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