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March 2021

Swelling in the feet and ankles is common during pregnancy, when your body naturally retains more fluids and exerts extra pressure on your lower limbs. However, swollen ankles can be uncomfortable and unpleasant. You may be able to reduce ankle swelling by avoiding standing for prolonged periods of time and by frequently resting and elevating your feet. While sitting, gently rotate and flex your feet at the ankles to stretch and strengthen the calf muscles. Participating in regular, low impact physical activities, like walking, riding a stationary bike, or swimming may also help reduce ankle swelling. For more information about pregnancy and foot health, please consult with a podiatrist.

Pregnant women with swollen feet can be treated with a variety of different methods that are readily available. For more information about other cures for swollen feet during pregnancy, consult with Dr. Michael A. Wood from Foot Health Institute. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

What Foot Problems Can Arise During Pregnancy?

One problem that can occur is overpronation, which occurs when the arch of the foot flattens and tends to roll inward.  This can cause pain and discomfort in your heels while you’re walking or even just standing up, trying to support your baby.  

Another problem is edema, or swelling in the extremities. This often affects the feet during pregnancy but tends to occur in the later stages. 

How Can I Keep My Feet Healthy During Pregnancy?

  • Wearing orthotics can provide extra support for the feet and help distribute weight evenly
  • Minimize the amount of time spent walking barefoot
  • Wear shoes with good arch support
  • Wear shoes that allow for good circulation to the feet
  • Elevate feet if you experience swelling
  • Massage your feet
  • Get regular, light exercise, such as walking, to promote blood circulation to the feet

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Lansing, and Chicago, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Foot Care for Pregnant Women
Monday, 22 March 2021 00:00

Grade 2 Ankle Sprains

Ankle sprains occur when the ligaments of the ankle are overstretched or torn during an injury. Sprains vary in severity, from mild Grade 1 sprains to severe Grade 3 sprains. A Grade 2 sprain is considered to be moderate and is characterized by some, but not all, of the ligament fibers being torn. The affected ankle and foot are often painful and moderately bruised or swollen, but the stability of the ankle joint is generally not affected. Grade 2 ankle sprains may require four to six weeks to heal fully. It is typically suggested that you avoid any activities that put extra strain on the injured ligaments for at least a month following the initial injury. If you have sprained your ankle, please see a podiatrist for treatment. 

Ankle sprains are common but need immediate attention. If you need your feet checked, contact Dr. Michael A. Wood from Foot Health Institute. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

How Does an Ankle Sprain Occur?

Ankle sprains take place when the ligaments in your ankle are torn or stretched beyond their limits. There are multiple ways that the ankle can become injured, including twisting or rolling over onto your ankle, putting undue stress on it, or causing trauma to the ankle itself.

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Mild to moderate bruising
  • Limited mobility
  • Swelling
  • Discoloration of the skin (depending on severity)

Preventing a Sprain

  • Wearing appropriate shoes for the occasion
  • Stretching before exercises and sports
  • Knowing your limits

Treatment of a Sprain

Treatment of a sprain depends on the severity.  Many times, people are told to rest and remain off their feet completely, while others are given an air cast. If the sprain is very severe, surgery may be required.

If you have suffered an ankle sprain previously, you may want to consider additional support such as a brace and regular exercises to strengthen the ankle.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Lansing, and Chicago, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Ankle Sprains
Monday, 15 March 2021 00:00

The Three F’s of Buying Running Shoes

When it comes to buying any shoes, but particularly running shoes, the most important factors to consider are the three F’s: fit, feel, and function. You can find the right fit by having your foot professionally measured in a shoe store. Many people find that their shoe size changes throughout their lifetime, that their feet naturally swell throughout the day, and that one foot may be slightly larger than the other. By having your feet measured, you can find the correct shoe size that will accommodate your feet as they are now. Your running shoes should feel snug, but not tight. It is also helpful to know what type of running you will be doing and on which terrain, as some shoes are built specifically for certain types of running. For more information on how to find the right shoes for you, please consult with a podiatrist. 

It is important to find shoes that fit you properly in order to avoid a variety of different foot problems. For more information about treatment, contact Dr. Michael A. Wood from Foot Health Institute. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Proper Shoe Fitting

Shoes have many different functions. They cushion our body weight, protect our feet, and allow us to safely play sports. You should always make sure that the shoes you wear fit you properly in order to avoid injuries and deformities such as: bunions, corns, calluses, hammertoes, plantar fasciitis, stress fractures, and more. It is important to note that although a certain pair of shoes might be a great fit for someone else, that doesn’t mean they will be a great fit for you. This is why you should always try on shoes before buying them to make sure they are worth the investment. Typically, shoes need to be replaced ever six months to one year of regular use.

Tips for Proper Shoe Fitting

  • Select a shoe that is shaped like your foot
  • Don’t buy shoes that fit too tight, expecting them to stretch to fit
  • Make sure there is enough space (3/8” to ½”) for your longest toe at the end of each shoe when you are standing up
  • Walk in the shoes to make sure they fit and feel right
  • Don’t select shoes by the size marked inside the shoe, but by how the shoe fits your foot

The shoes you buy should always feel as good as they look. Shoes that fit properly will last longer, feel better, and improve your way of life each day.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Lansing, and Chicago, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about How to Get a Proper Shoe Fit
Sunday, 14 March 2021 00:00

Are You Suffering From Ingrown Toenails?

If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to more serious concerns, such as an infection. Knowing proper nail care can help in the prevention of an ingrown toenail. Give us a call, and get treated!

Monday, 08 March 2021 00:00

Helping Broken Toes Heal at Home

A broken toe can be diagnosed and treated by your podiatrist. Once you go home, there are several things that you can do to promote healing and reduce pain or discomfort. Rest the affected foot by not putting weight on it and keeping it elevated on a stool or cushion. Icing the foot for 10 minutes every few hours can help reduce pain and swelling. Your podiatrist may also prescribe medication to help decrease pain. As the broken toe heals, wiggle your toes occasionally to promote flexibility and to stop them from becoming stiff. Wear comfortable shoes while walking that provide adequate support to the toe. For more information about helping broken toes heal, please consult with a podiatrist.

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Michael A. Wood from Foot Health Institute. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Lansing, and Chicago, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What to Know About a Broken Toe

The circulatory system in the body is rarely given any thought when it functions properly. It consists of blood flowing efficiently throughout the body, and is able to fight infection by supplying white blood cells with proper nutrients. When blood flow becomes restricted, artery disease may develop and progress. This can be a result of excess plaque that has developed in the arteries, which can narrow the space that blood can flow through. If this condition is left untreated, it may lead to conditions that can include reduced blood flow to the brain which may be followed by a stroke. Common symptoms of poor circulation are felt in the feet and legs, which may become numb and can cause difficulty in walking. It may be beneficial to practice a daily walking routine, and time and mileage may be gradually increased. If you have signs you may have poor circulation, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can determine what the best course of treatment is for you.

While poor circulation itself isn’t a condition; it is a symptom of another underlying health condition you may have. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Dr. Michael A. Wood of Foot Health Institute. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) can potentially lead to poor circulation in the lower extremities. PAD is a condition that causes the blood vessels and arteries to narrow. In a linked condition called atherosclerosis, the arteries stiffen up due to a buildup of plaque in the arteries and blood vessels. These two conditions can cause a decrease in the amount of blood that flows to your extremities, therefore resulting in pain.

Symptoms

Some of the most common symptoms of poor circulation are:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Throbbing or stinging pain in limbs
  • Pain
  • Muscle Cramps

Treatment for poor circulation often depends on the underlying condition that causes it. Methods for treatment may include insulin for diabetes, special exercise programs, surgery for varicose veins, or compression socks for swollen legs.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Lansing, and Chicago, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Causes Symptoms and Treatment for Poor Circulation in the Feet
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