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Foot Health Institute in Chicago, IL 60617 and Lansing, IL 60438 Main Menu

February 2020

Monday, 24 February 2020 00:00

Are My Feet Flat?

Flat feet can be identified by arches that are missing in the structure of the foot. This condition may be visible while standing, and can be noticed as the entire foot lies flat on the floor. Possible reasons for flat feet to occur may include genetic factors, a foot injury, or a medical ailment, such as arthritis. A common symptom that can be associated with this condition is achiness surrounding the ankle or the outside of the foot. Mild relief may be found when insoles are consistently worn. In severe cases, surgery may be considered to permanently straighten the foot. If you have flat feet, it is suggested that you speak with a podiatrist who can help you determine a proper treatment method.

Flatfoot is a condition many people suffer from. If you have flat feet, contact Dr. Michael A. Wood from Foot Health Institute. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Are Flat Feet?

Flatfoot is a condition in which the arch of the foot is depressed and the sole of the foot is almost completely in contact with the ground. About 20-30% of the population generally has flat feet because their arches never formed during growth.

Conditions & Problems:

Having flat feet makes it difficult to run or walk because of the stress placed on the ankles.

Alignment – The general alignment of your legs can be disrupted, because the ankles move inward which can cause major discomfort.

Knees – If you have complications with your knees, flat feet can be a contributor to arthritis in that area.  

Symptoms

  • Pain around the heel or arch area
  • Trouble standing on the tip toe
  • Swelling around the inside of the ankle
  • Flat look to one or both feet
  • Having your shoes feel uneven when worn

Treatment

If you are experiencing pain and stress on the foot you may weaken the posterior tibial tendon, which runs around the inside of the ankle. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Lansing, and Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 17 February 2020 00:00

Where Is the Plantar Fascia?

The plantar fascia is located at the bottom of the foot. It connects the heel to the toes, and if inflamed, may be referred to as the condition plantar fasciitis. Risk factors which may precede a plantar fascia injury can include wearing shoes that do not have adequate support, or standing on hard surfaces for the majority of the day. Additionally, existing medical conditions such as flat feet or obesity may play a significant role in developing plantar fasciitis. Common symptoms of this condition can include pain in the heel and surrounding area, and the discomfort may be more intense after arising in the morning. Some patients find it helpful to perform specific exercises that are designed to decrease a portion of the pain and swelling. If you are afflicted with this ailment, please schedule a consultation with a podiatrist as quickly as possible so the correct treatment can begin. 

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dr. Michael A. Wood  from Foot Health Institute. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Lansing, and Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis
Wednesday, 12 February 2020 00:00

It's Time for Beautiful Feet.

Want to wear open toe shoes again? ...Special occasion? Vacation? ...You don't need an excuse to have beautiful nails.

Monday, 10 February 2020 00:00

Possible Causes of Cracked Heels

The condition that is known as cracked heels can occur as a result of cold winter temperatures, or from medical conditions that may include diabetes, psoriasis, or eczema. It can cause pain and discomfort, and in severe cases, the affected area may bleed. There are methods that can be implemented which may help to prevent cracked heels from developing. It is beneficial to wash and dry the feet thoroughly, followed by using a moisturizer on the feet and toes. In mild cases, research has indicated it may help to exfoliate excess dry skin, and this can be done by using a pumice stone. Additionally, it may help to wear shoes that have closed backs, and socks that are made of cotton or wool. If you have this condition, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can help you to manage cracked heels. 

If the skin on your feet starts to crack, you may want to see a podiatrist to find treatment. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Michael A. Wood from Foot Health Institute. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Cracked Heels

It is important to moisturize your cracked heels in order to prevent pain, bleeding, and infection. The reason cracked heels form is because the skin on the foot is too dry to support the immense pressure placed on them. When the foot expands, the dry skin on the foot begins to split.

Ways to Help Heal Them

  • Invest in a good foot cream
  • Try Using Petroleum Jelly
  • Ease up on Soaps
  • Drink Plenty of Water

Ways to Prevent Cracked Heels

  • Moisturize After Showering
  • Skip a Shower
  • Keep Shower Water Lukewarm
  • Don’t Scrub Your Feet

If you are unsure how to proceed in treating cracked heels, seek guidance from a podiatrist. Your doctor will help you with any questions or information you may need. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Lansing, and Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 03 February 2020 00:00

Wounds Require Immediate Treatment

Minor wounds can be treated simply by thoroughly washing the affected area, followed by covering it with a bandage. However, if the wound is severe, it may be beneficial to get medical attention. There are noticeable signs of a serious wound. These can include consistent bleeding that won’t stop when direct pressure is applied to it, or if the wound is a result of an accident or injury. The wound may require stitches, or skin glue may be used which will depend on the type of wound that is being treated. Wounds on the feet can have serious implications, and must be treated promptly and correctly. If you are a diabetic patient, and have developed wounds on the feet, it is strongly advised that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can effectively treat your wounds and help you to manage your condition.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Michael A. Wood from Foot Health Institute. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Lansing, and Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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